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Netflix reboot promotes diversity

Alice Webster, staff writer

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The classic 1980s television show She-Ra used to be a mere relic of the past to today’s youth, but a Netflix reboot has brought the tough superheroine back into the limelight. She-Ra and the Princesses of Power’s first season aired on Netflix in November 2018 to great critical reception, but is it really that good?

The short answer is yes. The long answer is much more complex. The most easily observable draw is the gorgeous animation. Not only is the scenery stunning in every scene, but the design of each character is distinct and realistic. Take She-Ra herself, for example. While many female warriors in popular culture have been scantily clad and unrealistically skinny, She-Ra has visible muscles and useful armor. Not only does the appearance of each character compliment his or her personality, but the variety of body types and skin colors provides diversity.

The more obvious aspects of diversity in the show are not the only ones present. Following in the footsteps of fellow cult classic Steven Universe, it features a lesbian couple in the form of Spinnerella and Netossa, minor members of the Princess Alliance who appear mostly in the final episode of Season One. Despite no confirmation as of yet, fans speculate that Adora and Catra’s relationship, as well as possibly Glimmer and Adora’s, is not platonic, a view which seems to be shared by creator Noelle Stevenson through her tweets and interviews.

Furthermore, the story is primarily character driven which forces writers to create interesting characters with depth rather than just vehicles for the plot. Bow, Adora’s friend and ally, breaks the mold of the typical male action hero, preferring flowers and hugs to swords and violence while still maintaining his status as a useful member of the group. Glimmer and Perfuma also put on more traditionally feminine personas but are vital to the alliance.

Overall, She-Ra and the Princesses of Power is not only a colorful kids cartoon but also a deep and meaningful story of love and doing what is right.

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Netflix reboot promotes diversity